Review of: Zanoni

Reviewed by:
Rating:
5
On 31.12.2019
Last modified:31.12.2019

Summary:

Mobilen GerГten nahtlos funktioniert, den ein Online-Casino bietet.

Zanoni

Gegründet im Jahr von der Familie Zanoni, mit 6 Hektar Rebfläche, in Quinzano bei Verona. Bestockt mit Corvina und Corvinone. Zanoni legt viel Wert auf. Marco Zanoni, Portrait- und Reportagefotograf. Logo Zanoni · Wohnen · Arbeiten · Weiteres · Entwicklung · Verfahren · Kommissionen · Profil · Bereiche · Team · Wohn- und Geschäftshaus Limmatquai

Zanoni & Zanoni, Wien

Firma · Projekte · Geschäftshaus Löwenplatz Zürich · Privathaus, Rigistrasse Zürich · Buchserstrasse Aarau · Laurenzenvorstadt Aarau · Turbenthal · Ferienhaus. ZANONI Architekten haben ein Haus an Zürichs repräsentativer Limmatfront saniert und umgebaut. Tomaso Zanoni erklärt, wie die Qualitäten. Marco Zanoni, Portrait- und Reportagefotograf.

Zanoni Ratings and reviews Video

Calzone 🍕👨🏻‍🍳🇮🇹 du chef simone zanoni

Zanoniintroduced the concept of the wandering, eternal adepts into popular culture, with this tale of tragic love. Bulwer Lytton also wrote the fantasy Vril, The Power of the Coming Race, a prototype for fictions of lost civilizations to come. Zanonihad a huge influence on Theosophists. Zanoni was an awesomely crafted story that I think I read ( pages) in record time. The characters were well crafted and each reflected the individual states of Being found common in almost all human beings. Our faults and our Graces. Zanoni, a timeless Rosicrucian brother, cannot fall in love without losing his power of immortality; but he does fall in love with Viola Pisani, a promising young opera singer from Naples, the daughter of Pisani, a misunderstood Italian violinist. Inhaber der Website und verantwortlich für den Inhalt: Gelateria Luciano Zanoni GmbH am Lugeck 7, Wien Tel: +43 (1) 79 79 E-Mail: [email protected] Zanoni Mill is located nine miles northeast of Gainesville on Hwy. It boasts the only overshot water wheel operation in the Ozark County mills. It is now an event venue! Milling began at Zanoni during Civil War days in a little mud-built cabin built by John Cody.

Chinese Trad. Greek Dutch Turkish Hebrew Japanese Polish Danish 6. Korean 5. Arabic 3. Norwegian 3. Czech 2. Serbian 2. Swedish 2.

Finnish 1. Hungarian 1. Slovak 1. Thai 1. Show reviews that mention. All reviews gelato ice cream cakes panini profiteroles apple strudel dark chocolate quick service great coffee cone cashier stephansplatz cathedral euros german tourists.

Selected filters. Buon appetito. Mit der Eröffnung seiner Eisdiele am Währinger Gürtel begann eine italienische Erfolgsgeschichte die den wiener Traditionsbetrieb bis heute prägt.

Harte Arbeit, Bescheidenheit und die leidenschaftliche Hingabe der ganzen Familie an den Betrieb garantieren seit über 30 Jahren kreative Eiskompositionen, höchste Produktionsstandards und qualitative Spitzenprodukte aus eigener Erzeugung.

He will be to the last largely before the public. The blood is the life. Popular Press. History of Gujarati Literature.

New Delhi: Sahitya Akademi. Read Books. Logos, Mantra, Theurgy. How difficult it is to achieve perfection. Edward Bulwer-Lytton. Heydon Hall Knebworth House.

Get A Copy. Paperback , pages. Published December 1st by Steiner Books first published More Details Original Title.

Other Editions Friend Reviews. To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up. To ask other readers questions about Zanoni , please sign up.

Lists with This Book. Community Reviews. Showing Average rating 3. Rating details. More filters. Sort order. Start your review of Zanoni: A Rosicrucian Tale.

It is easier to add to our read list here at Goodreads and a couple years ago if I found a book while reading or listening to an OTR Old Time Radio , I started putting a note in my comment section.

Besides those books being wonderful, the It is easier to add to our read list here at Goodreads and a couple years ago if I found a book while reading or listening to an OTR Old Time Radio , I started putting a note in my comment section.

Besides those books being wonderful, the author would list books when appropriate; hence "Zanoni". It has taken me a long time to finally pick up this story and all I can say in a few words, this story speaks to my soul!

It lifts me up higher in my thoughts of life and The Almighty! Is this a religious read? It depends on what one considers that realm.

This is an ultimate favorite and wonderful find for me. The reason I bring that up is a name I did this to showed up in another story in my Delphi Collection of his works.

So in my curiosity, I came up with a story that is shorter, written earlier with some of the same characters, "Zicci".

Many older stories are not always talked about on the Internet and "Zicci" was that sort. So of course I will read that next and compare. Edward Bulwer Lytton was an interesting character and writer.

I will be putting some quotes here from my edition. They had a charm for him early in life, and he pursued them with the earnestness which characterised his pursuit of other studies.

He became absorbed in wizard lore; he equipped himself with magical implements, — with rods for transmitting influence, and crystal balls in which to discern coming scenes and persons; and communed with spiritualists and mediums.

Before the author goes into that history, he talks of the men of Enlightenment. After reading this book, I come away with knowing more history and the men of The Enlightenment Age.

The lack of belief in God is quite profuse and it is always interesting when some men about to die look for God who they denied exist.

I come away after reading this with a stronger faith in God. Can one believe in God and science? Yes, there are so many wonders and unknowns that may never be explained and having a Faith in God does not make one any less of intelligent because one believes.

We have a free choice to believe or not believe, I chose to have Faith. Two quotes below are from that gentleman talking to the author and Lytton giving a history of his friend.

At the same time he did not regard the crimes of that stormy period with the philosophical leniency with which enlightened writers their heads safe upon their shoulders are, in the present day, inclined to treat the massacres of the past: he spoke not as a student who had read and reasoned, but as a man who had seen and suffered.

London, January, It is original in its conception, and pervaded by one central idea; but it would have been improved, we think, by a more sparing use of the supernatural.

The inevitable effect of so much hackneyed diablerie — of such an accumulation of wonder upon wonder — is to deaden the impression they would naturally make upon us.

I think the supernatural element is an important part of the story for so many reasons. It gives more of a good verses evil; the meaning of life and would one really like to live forever on Earth or look for everlasting life in Heaven.

You see many characters which at the end of the story, the editor explains, though he says the reader will come away with their own ideas.

One character has no care but science for science's sake without a care for humanity. Another sees humanity and science and the need to uplift others.

A character of passion and desires that does not think of consequences and not a bad person. A person with superstition that lurks in the mind and is afraid of things unknown not having Faith in what is good.

I could go on and on but will rap my thoughts up soon. In the explanation of the story at the end, they say this is really not a romance especially on Viola's part but I disagree again.

This is romance from start to finish. I never knew what twist and turns this book would take; the ending was all that in grandeur.

In my edition the story described- "Zanoni was published in and is often considered to be the first modern British novel of occult fantasy.

Pontiac Sundown Wasola. Althea Dillia Luna. United States portal. And now you thought you heard the lullaby which a fairy might sing to some fretful changeling it had adopted and sought to soothe.

Liquid, low, silvery, streamed the tones beneath the enchanted bow. The most stubborn grief would have paused to hear; and withal, at times, out came a wild, merry, ringing note, like a laugh, but not mortal laughter.

It was one of his most successful airs from his beloved opera,—the Siren in the act of charming the waves and the winds to sleep.

Heaven knows what next would have come, but his arm was arrested. Viola had thrown herself on his breast, and kissed him, with happy eyes that smiled through her sunny hair.

At that very moment the door opened,—a message from the Cardinal. Viola must go to his Eminence at once.

Her mother went with her. All was reconciled and settled; Viola had her way, and selected her own opera. O ye dull nations of the North, with your broils and debates,—your bustling lives of the Pnyx and the Agora!

But whose the opera? No cabinet intrigue ever was so secret. Pisani came back one night from the theatre, evidently disturbed and irate.

Woe to thine ears hadst thou heard the barbiton that night! They had suspended him from his office,—they feared that the new opera, and the first debut of his daughter as prima donna, would be too much for his nerves.

And his variations, his diablerie of sirens and harpies, on such a night, made a hazard not to be contemplated without awe. For the first time he spoke in words upon the subject, and gravely asked—for that question the barbiton, eloquent as it was, could not express distinctly—what was to be the opera, and what the part?

And Viola as gravely answered that she was pledged to the Cardinal not to reveal. Pisani said nothing, but disappeared with the violin; and presently they heard the Familiar from the house-top whither, when thoroughly out of humour, the musician sometimes fled , whining and sighing as if its heart were broken.

The affections of Pisani were little visible on the surface. He was not one of those fond, caressing fathers whose children are ever playing round their knees; his mind and soul were so thoroughly in his art that domestic life glided by him, seemingly as if THAT were a dream, and the heart the substantial form and body of existence.

Persons much cultivating an abstract study are often thus; mathematicians proverbially so. Do you know what the illustrious Giardini said when the tyro asked how long it would take to learn to play on the violin?

No, Pisani; often, with the keen susceptibility of childhood, poor Viola had stolen from the room to weep at the thought that thou didst not love her.

And yet, underneath this outward abstraction of the artist, the natural fondness flowed all the same; and as she grew up, the dreamer had understood the dreamer.

The eventful hour is come. Viola is gone to the theatre,—her mother with her. The indignant musician remains at home. He must lay aside his violin; he must put on his brocade coat and his lace ruffles.

Here they are,—quick, quick! And quick rolls the gilded coach, and majestic sits the driver, and statelily prance the steeds.

Poor Pisani is lost in a mist of uncomfortable amaze. He arrives at the theatre; he descends at the great door; he turns round and round, and looks about him and about: he misses something,—where is the violin?

But then, what bursts upon him! Does he dream? The first act is over they did not send for him till success seemed no longer doubtful ; the first act has decided all.

He feels THAT by the electric sympathy which ever the one heart has at once with a vast audience. He feels it by the breathless stillness of that multitude; he feels it even by the lifted finger of the Cardinal.

He sees his Viola on the stage, radiant in her robes and gems,—he hears her voice thrilling through the single heart of the thousands!

But the scene, the part, the music! It is his other child,—his immortal child; the spirit-infant of his soul; his darling of many years of patient obscurity and pining genius; his masterpiece; his opera of the Siren!

And there she stands, as all souls bow before her,—fairer than the very Siren he had called from the deeps of melody. Oh, long and sweet recompense of toil!

Where is on earth the rapture like that which is known to genius when at last it bursts from its hidden cavern into light and fame!

He did not speak, he did not move; he stood transfixed, breathless, the tears rolling down his cheeks; only from time to time his hands still wandered about,—mechanically they sought for the faithful instrument, why was it not there to share his triumph?

At last the curtain fell; but on such a storm and diapason of applause! Up rose the audience as one man, as with one voice that dear name was shouted.

The good old Cardinal drew him gently forward. Wild musician, thy daughter has given thee back more than the life thou gavest!

Now notwithstanding the triumph both of the singer and the opera, there had been one moment in the first act, and, consequently, BEFORE the arrival of Pisani, when the scale seemed more than doubtful.

It was in a chorus replete with all the peculiarities of the composer. And when the Maelstrom of Capricci whirled and foamed, and tore ear and sense through every variety of sound, the audience simultaneously recognised the hand of Pisani.

A title had been given to the opera which had hitherto prevented all suspicion of its parentage; and the overture and opening, in which the music had been regular and sweet, had led the audience to fancy they detected the genius of their favourite Paisiello.

Long accustomed to ridicule and almost to despise the pretensions of Pisani as a composer, they now felt as if they had been unduly cheated into the applause with which they had hailed the overture and the commencing scenas.

An ominous buzz circulated round the house: the singers, the orchestra,—electrically sensitive to the impression of the audience,—grew, themselves, agitated and dismayed, and failed in the energy and precision which could alone carry off the grotesqueness of the music.

There are always in every theatre many rivals to a new author and a new performer,—a party impotent while all goes well, but a dangerous ambush the instant some accident throws into confusion the march of success.

A hiss arose; it was partial, it is true, but the significant silence of all applause seemed to forebode the coming moment when the displeasure would grow contagious.

It was the breath that stirred the impending avalanche. At that critical moment Viola, the Siren queen, emerged for the first time from her ocean cave.

As she came forward to the lamps, the novelty of her situation, the chilling apathy of the audience,—which even the sight of so singular a beauty did not at the first arouse,—the whispers of the malignant singers on the stage, the glare of the lights, and more—far more than the rest—that recent hiss, which had reached her in her concealment, all froze up her faculties and suspended her voice.

And, instead of the grand invocation into which she ought rapidly to have burst, the regal Siren, retransformed into the trembling girl, stood pale and mute before the stern, cold array of those countless eyes.

At that instant, and when consciousness itself seemed about to fail her, as she turned a timid beseeching glance around the still multitude, she perceived, in a box near the stage, a countenance which at once, and like magic, produced on her mind an effect never to be analysed nor forgotten.

It was one that awakened an indistinct, haunting reminiscence, as if she had seen it in those day-dreams she had been so wont from infancy to indulge.

She could not withdraw her gaze from that face, and as she gazed, the awe and coldness that had before seized her, vanished like a mist from before the sun.

In the dark splendour of the eyes that met her own there was indeed so much of gentle encouragement, of benign and compassionate admiration,—so much that warmed, and animated, and nerved,—that any one, actor or orator, who has ever observed the effect that a single earnest and kindly look in the crowd that is to be addressed and won, will produce upon his mind, may readily account for the sudden and inspiriting influence which the eye and smile of the stranger exercised on the debutante.

And while yet she gazed, and the glow returned to her heart, the stranger half rose, as if to recall the audience to a sense of the courtesy due to one so fair and young; and the instant his voice gave the signal, the audience followed it by a burst of generous applause.

For this stranger himself was a marked personage, and his recent arrival at Naples had divided with the new opera the gossip of the city.

From that time Viola forgot the crowd, the hazard, the whole world,—except the fairy one over with she presided. Only when all was over, and she saw her father and felt his joy, did this wild spell vanish before the sweeter one of the household and filial love.

Why, Viola, strange child, sittest thou apart, thy face leaning on thy fair hands, thine eyes fixed on space? Up, rouse thee! Every dimple on the cheek of home must smile to-night.

And a happy reunion it was round that humble table: a feast Lucullus might have envied in his Hall of Apollo, in the dried grapes, and the dainty sardines, and the luxurious polenta, and the old lacrima a present from the good Cardinal.

The barbiton, placed on a chair—a tall, high-backed chair—beside the musician, seemed to take a part in the festive meal. Its honest varnished face glowed in the light of the lamp; and there was an impish, sly demureness in its very silence, as its master, between every mouthful, turned to talk to it of something he had forgotten to relate before.

You give me so much joy, child,—I am so proud of thee and myself. But he and I, poor fellow, have been so often unhappy together!

The intoxication of vanity and triumph, the happiness in the happiness she had caused, all this was better than sleep. But still from all this, again and again her thoughts flew to those haunting eyes, to that smile with which forever the memory of the triumph, of the happiness, was to be united.

Her feelings, like her own character, were strange and peculiar. They were not those of a girl whose heart, for the first time reached through the eye, sighs its natural and native language of first love.

It was not so much admiration, though the face that reflected itself on every wave of her restless fancies was of the rarest order of majesty and beauty; nor a pleased and enamoured recollection that the sight of this stranger had bequeathed: it was a human sentiment of gratitude and delight, mixed with something more mysterious, of fear and awe.

Certainly she had seen before those features; but when and how? Only when her thoughts had sought to shape out her future, and when, in spite of all the attempts to vision forth a fate of flowers and sunshine, a dark and chill foreboding made her recoil back into her deepest self.

It was a something found that had long been sought for by a thousand restless yearnings and vague desires, less of the heart than mind; not as when youth discovers the one to be beloved, but rather as when the student, long wandering after the clew to some truth in science, sees it glimmer dimly before him, to beckon, to recede, to allure, and to wane again.

She fell at last into unquiet slumber, vexed by deformed, fleeting, shapeless phantoms; and, waking, as the sun, through a veil of hazy cloud, glinted with a sickly ray across the casement, she heard her father settled back betimes to his one pursuit, and calling forth from his Familiar a low mournful strain, like a dirge over the dead.

I meant to be merry, and compose an air in honour of thee; but he is an obstinate fellow, this,—and he would have it so. It was the custom of Pisani, except when the duties of his profession made special demand on his time, to devote a certain portion of the mid-day to sleep,—a habit not so much a luxury as a necessity to a man who slept very little during the night.

In fact, whether to compose or to practice, the hours of noon were precisely those in which Pisani could not have been active if he would.

His genius resembled those fountains full at dawn and evening, overflowing at night, and perfectly dry at the meridian. During this time, consecrated by her husband to repose, the signora generally stole out to make the purchases necessary for the little household, or to enjoy as what woman does not?

And the day following this brilliant triumph, how many congratulations would she have to receive! As she thus sat, rather in reverie than thought, a man coming from the direction of Posilipo, with a slow step and downcast eyes, passed close by the house, and Viola, looking up abruptly, started in a kind of terror as she recognised the stranger.

She uttered an involuntary exclamation, and the cavalier turning, saw, and paused. He stood a moment or two between her and the sunlit ocean, contemplating in a silence too serious and gentle for the boldness of gallantry, the blushing face and the young slight form before him; at length he spoke.

From sixteen to thirty, the music in the breath of applause is sweeter than all the music your voice can utter!

And I feel, too, Excellency, that I have you to thank, though, perhaps, you scarce know why! Perhaps you would rather I should have admired the singer?

And now, since we have thus met, I will pause to counsel you. When next you go to the theatre, you will have at your feet all the young gallants of Naples.

Poor infant! Remember that the only homage that does not sully must be that which these gallants will not give thee. And whatever thy dreams of the future,—and I see, while I speak to thee, how wandering they are, and wild,—may only those be fulfilled which centre round the hearth of home.

And with a burst of natural and innocent emotions, scarcely comprehending, though an Italian, the grave nature of his advice, she exclaimed,—.

And my father,—there would be no home, signor, without him! A deep and melancholy shade settled over the face of the cavalier.

He looked up at the quiet house buried amidst the vine-leaves, and turned again to the vivid, animated face of the young actress.

Adieu, fair singer. Look how it grows up, crooked and distorted. Some wind scattered the germ from which it sprang, in the clefts of the rock; choked up and walled round by crags and buildings, by Nature and man, its life has been one struggle for the light,—light which makes to that life the necessity and the principle: you see how it has writhed and twisted; how, meeting the barrier in one spot, it has laboured and worked, stem and branches, towards the clear skies at last.

What has preserved it through each disfavour of birth and circumstances,—why are its leaves as green and fair as those of the vine behind you, which, with all its arms, can embrace the open sunshine?

My child, because of the very instinct that impelled the struggle,—because the labour for the light won to the light at length.

So with a gallant heart, through every adverse accident of sorrow and of fate to turn to the sun, to strive for the heaven; this it is that gives knowledge to the strong and happiness to the weak.

Ere we meet again, you will turn sad and heavy eyes to those quiet boughs, and when you hear the birds sing from them, and see the sunshine come aslant from crag and housetop to be the playfellow of their leaves, learn the lesson that Nature teaches you, and strive through darkness to the light!

As he spoke he moved on slowly, and left Viola wondering, silent, saddened with his dim prophecy of coming evil, and yet, through sadness, charmed. Involuntarily her eyes followed him,—involuntarily she stretched forth her arms, as if by a gesture to call him back; she would have given worlds to have seen him turn,—to have heard once more his low, calm, silvery voice; to have felt again the light touch of his hand on hers.

As moonlight that softens into beauty every angle on which it falls, seemed his presence,—as moonlight vanishes, and things assume their common aspect of the rugged and the mean, he receded from her eyes, and the outward scene was commonplace once more.

The stranger passed on, through that long and lovely road which reaches at last the palaces that face the public gardens, and conducts to the more populous quarters of the city.

A group of young, dissipated courtiers, loitering by the gateway of a house which was open for the favourite pastime of the day,—the resort of the wealthier and more high-born gamesters,—made way for him, as with a courteous inclination he passed them by.

He has not been many days at Naples, and I cannot yet find any one who knows aught of his birthplace, his parentage, or, what is more important, his estates!

See,—no, you cannot see it here; but it rides yonder in the bay. The bankers he deals with speak with awe of the sums placed in their hands.

My valet learned from some of the sailors on the Mole that he had resided many years in the interior of India.

Here comes our prince of gamesters, Cetoxa; be sure that he already must have made acquaintance with so wealthy a cavalier; he has that attraction to gold which the magnet has to steel.

Well, Cetoxa, what fresh news of the ducats of Signor Zanoni? He desired a box at San Carlo; but I need not tell you that the expectation of a new opera ah, how superb it is,—that poor devil, Pisani; who would have thought it?

He accepts it,—I wait on him between the acts; he is most charming; he invites me to supper. Cospetto, what a retinue! We sit late,—I tell him all the news of Naples; we grow bosom friends; he presses on me this diamond before we part,—is a trifle, he tells me: the jewellers value it at pistoles!

And what, after all, do these rumours, when sifted, amount to? They have no origin but this,—a silly old man of eighty-six, quite in his dotage, solemnly avers that he saw this same Zanoni seventy years ago he himself, the narrator, then a mere boy at Milan; when this very Zanoni, as you all see, is at least as young as you or I, Belgioso.

Old Avelli declares that Zanoni does not seem a day older than when they met at Milan. He says that even then at Milan—mark this—where, though under another name, this Zanoni appeared in the same splendour, he was attended also by the same mystery.

Du musst es Even Money im Casino umsetzen. - Das Ökosystem immer im Blick

Wäre notwendig und superangebot. I guess I'm glad I read this, but I'm not sure anyone else needs to. It is worth noting that Zanoni is endowed with solar attributes Both Was Sind Luchadores schemes founder in the test of hard reality Livescore.Com Ergebnisse human fallibility. Iako je ovaj roman objavljen Heydon Hall Knebworth House.
Zanoni
Zanoni
Zanoni Mehr Bewertungen anzeigen. Bewertungen von Reisenden. Finnisch 1.

Blackjack Varianten auf Basis von Zufallszahlen Even Money es Veldhuis Zanoni. - Erwähnt in

Atem ist nicht nur ein physiologischer Vorgang. 10/2/ · Order food online at Zanoni & Zanoni, Vienna with Tripadvisor: See 1, unbiased reviews of Zanoni & Zanoni, ranked # on Tripadvisor among 4, restaurants in Vienna/5(2K). Gelateria Luciano Zanoni GmbH am Lugeck 7, Wien Tel: +43 (1) 79 79 E-Mail: [email protected] DATENSCHUTZERKLÄRUNG. Zanoni Designer Second Hand. 53 likes · 55 were here. Designer Second Hand // Contemporary Vintage // Premium Damenlabels // Berlin Schöneberg // Ankauf & KommissionFollowers: And not a sun that sets not somewhere on the silenced music,—on Zanoni faded laurel! Why did I not seek to know you before? They exchanged glances of dismay. Interesting, but a little dark You heard that sound through the silence. Oh, Dart Home Tour barbiton, how horribly thou Zanoni scold! I have no servant,—none! There might be another cause for this disposition to credulity. To inspire her with emulation, his Eminence took her one evening to his own box: it would be something to see the performance, something more to hear the applause lavished upon the glittering signoras she was hereafter to excel! Pisani missed something,—what, he scarcely knew; it was a combination of the two wants most essential to his mental life,—the voice of his wife, the touch of his Familiar. You have not suffered even your gratitude to Canova to blind you to the superiority of Flaxman. She stole away, threw her veil over her face, and hurried from the house. No other works of the author, contradictory as have been the Spiele Kostenlos Und Ohne Anmelden of them, have provoked such a diversity of criticism as these. Date of visit: Www Bigfarm Goodgames Logo Zanoni · Wohnen · Arbeiten · Weiteres · Entwicklung · Verfahren · Kommissionen · Profil · Bereiche · Team · Wohn- und Geschäftshaus Limmatquai ZANONI Architekten . Tomaso Zanoni. Städtebau, Architektur, Beratung. Bederstrasse 33 Zürich. Mehr; 90 40 *; Route; Web. ZANONI Architekten haben ein Haus an Zürichs repräsentativer Limmatfront saniert und umgebaut. Tomaso Zanoni erklärt, wie die Qualitäten. Firma · Projekte · Geschäftshaus Löwenplatz Zürich · Privathaus, Rigistrasse Zürich · Buchserstrasse Aarau · Laurenzenvorstadt Aarau · Turbenthal · Ferienhaus.

Facebooktwitterredditpinterestlinkedinmail

2 Kommentare

Mezira · 31.12.2019 um 14:12

die MaГџgebliche Antwort, anziehend...

Schreibe einen Kommentar

Deine E-Mail-Adresse wird nicht veröffentlicht. Erforderliche Felder sind mit * markiert.